Consultant Is Not Suitable To Hire The Right Consultant

Friday, November 22nd 2019. | resume

Consultant-Is-Not-Suitable-To-Hire-The-Right-Consultant Consultant Is Not Suitable To Hire The Right Consultant

 

Consultant Is Not Suitable To Hire The Right Consultant

I constantly work with other consultants with or on behalf of my clients. Some are consultants that I support my clients with the search, other consultants that they have found themselves. In 99% of the cases, the relationships and projects have a successful result, in the remaining 1% everyone wonders what went wrong.

In the business world, there are many examples of consultants who end up with less than desirable outcomes. Sometimes it’s because the person is not a consultant at all – she’s in transition or just filling in the time between jobs. In other cases, it may be that the consultant does not fit the organization or the project has not been clearly defined.

When hiring a consultant or contractor, you must have the following:

A person who fits your organization

A relationship that is initially designed for success

A deal that is fair for both sides

A clearly defined project

I can not tell you how much time, energy and money are wasted if these things are not there.

An external consultant offers entrepreneurs and small businesses many benefits, such as: For example, objective advice, a reference framework and best practices from other clients, methods and models to achieve faster results and transfer capabilities to internal resources on a permanent basis. While external consultants can be great, the wrong one can cause as many problems as they were charged with solving. The lack of sensitivity to the customer’s business and culture, the “outsider” threat to employees, and the provision of “perfect” solutions that are not practical for the customer’s business are just a few of the issues I’ve seen.

If you find the best adviser for your needs, I suggest the following:

Referrals: Ask trusted business colleagues for the names of people who have used them for similar purposes, and specifically learn about the results. If you have someone who has directed your business in the right direction, they are happy to provide you with the contact information.

Chemistry & Rapport: Talk to the potential adviser several times and meet him before hiring him. If you see the other person as a peer and potential partner, you are working in the right direction. If you do not respect them or just consider them as salesmen or subordinates, please do not do so. You need a business partner for a specific problem.

If that person is a friend of yours, rate the relationship as a peer or potential partner. I can not tell you how many “friendships” were tense due to unsolicited expectations. If you rate the relationship as a peer or potential partner for assistance with a particular issue, things are going smoothly.

Due Diligence: Make sure that the consultant has a valid business, with business cards, website, marketing materials, reference letters from previous customers, work samples and proven records of the delivery of the products you need. All consultants have different experiences, but I believe that the real experience is a key differentiator.

Behavior & Sound: The counselor should look professional and act accordingly. Your language should be clear and clear. Be aware of her tone. Are you talking to you as a partner or talking to you? I can not tell you how many consultants I have met who have forgotten that they are not the customer. And if you get voicemail, do not worry, it shows that they are busy. The key is, will you contact you immediately?

Fee and Contract Structure: A good consultant is willing to structure the agreement to work best for you both. The consulting fees vary dramatically and the work is usually done on a project or hourly basis. Both have advantages and disadvantages.

Suggestion: The consultant should make you a proposal based on clear business outcomes rather than a methodology. You need solutions and you need them the first time. Each proposal should include an overview of the work to be carried out, milestone dates, the frequency of billing and whether the payment is due immediately, net 15 or net 30.

And above all, as a consultant, it’s also my job to make sure I’m the right size for a customer’s organization. I love working with clients on new projects, but I’m also very pleased to be able to refer a potential customer to another consultant whom I believe offers solutions tailored to their specific needs.

An outside perspective is a big advantage for business owners. I hope this list helps you find the right solution for your organization.